Microwaving water for tea: Why are the results so lousy?

But microwaves don’t heat water evenly, so the boiling process is difficult to control. Microwave ovens shoot tiny waves into the liquid at random locations, causing the water molecules at those points to vibrate rapidly. If the water isn’t heated for long enough, the result is isolated pockets of very hot or boiling water amid a larger body of water that’s cooler. Such water may misleadingly exhibit signs of boiling despite not being a uniform 212 degrees. For instance, what appears to be steam rising from a mug of microwaved water is only moist vapor evaporating off the water’s surface and condensing into mist on contact with cooler air—it’s the same principle that makes our breath visible on frigid days.

via Microwaving water for tea: Why are the results so lousy?.

Happy Earth Tea – Why is Darjeeling first flush so green in appearance?

“Next we do not hold it for fermentation/oxidation but immediately take the leaves into the drying chamber. Once the leaves are dry it is ready to be sorted and packed. This is why, because of very little oxidation, the first flush takes such a greenish appearance.”

 

Is Darjeeling first flush then a black tea? Going by the general convention it is still referred as black tea, however, essentially it is more like a  lightly oxidized unroasted oolong. No wonder there are some similarities in the character profile of such oolongs, especially the ones from Taiwan, with Darjeeling.

 

via Happy Earth Tea – Why is Darjeeling first flush so green in appearance?.